Explore Polly, Texas and Step Into the Past of the Lone Star State
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Explore Polly, Texas and Step Into the Past of the Lone Star State

Jose Policarpio “Polly” Rodriguez was an early explorer of Texas, a surveyor, army scout, minister, gunsmith, Texas Ranger, and Justice of the Peace. Spending time roaming around Texas meant pick of the crop for good settlement locations. In the late 1800s, Polly did just that; he purchased land in what is now Pipe Creek and built a community. Today, the chapel, cemetery, and some buildings remain. Learn more about this esteemed Tejano man who became the namesake of Polly, Texas (originally called the J.P. Rodriguez Settlement).

Explore Polly, Texas and Step Into the Past of the Lone Star State

Photo Courtesy of HomeTownInMyRearView

Travel approximately 8.5 miles northeast of Bandera, and you will find Polly’s Chapel along the banks of Privilege Creeks. Construction of this limestone structure began in 1879 and is notable for its positioning to take advantage of prevalent breezes as well as the tall Romanesque windows and 14-foot ceiling. Finalized at 1,024 square feet, the capacity of Polly’s Chapel is 120 worshipers. An official Texas Historical Landmark since 1986, weddings and events may now be held there.

Explore Polly, Texas and Step Into the Past of the Lone Star State

Photo Courtesy of HomeTownInMyRearView

At one time, Polly featured a post office, general store, and school which was built in 1892. Ruins of these structures can be found there still. Polly’s home is called “The Fort” due to its fortified means of architecture. Designed with two floors, the house tied to Polly’s military life by sporting gun ports for defense, one man entry points, and alternating exits on both sides from upstairs as well as downstairs.

Explore Polly, Texas and Step Into the Past of the Lone Star State

Photo Courtesy of HomeTownInMyRearView

Jose Policarpio “Polly” Rodriguez died in 1914, at the age of 85. He is buried here. The Polly Texas Pioneer Association is actively saving and restoring the site. Help financially or volunteer to do your part for the early history of Texas settlers. Visitors are welcome here daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and the cemetery is currently accepting new burials with advance purchase. Looking for a road trip ending in a place to explore? Search for Polly, Texas and enter the past!

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Written by Honky Tonk Foodie

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